It's official. The Catholic Knight is retired.  I'm hanging up the helmet and passing the torch. There will be no more articles, no more commentaries, no more calls to action. THIS BLOG IS CLOSED. I've spent a very long time thinking about this, I believe the time has come, and is a bit overdue.  I want to thank my readers for everything, but most especially for your encouragement and your willingness to go out there and fight the good fight. So, that being the case, I've spend the last several weeks looking for bloggers who are fairly active, and best represent something akin to the way I think and what I believe.  I recommend the following blogs for my readers to bookmark and check on regularly. Pick one as your favourite, or pick them all. They are all great..... In His Majesty's Service, THE CATHOLIC KNIGHT

Saturday, June 17, 2006

New Mass Translation Is More Biblical

Changes to Mass to reflect Latin translation and Biblical origins

Los Angeles, Jun. 16, 2006 (CNA) - Following Thursday’s approval of a new translation of the Mass in English, by the Bishops of the United States, several Catholics are wondering how the Mass changes will affect their experience. Below are listed a few of the more notable changes to the words the congregation prays:

On of the most commonly used exchanges between priest and people during the Mass is currently translated "The Lord be with you" / "And also with you". The new translation would read, "The Lord be with you" / "And with your spirit". Bishop Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds (England) and Chairman of the International Commission on English in the Liturgy, briefly explained this change yesterday.

The translation of the phrase “et cum spritu tuo,” Bishop Roche said, “cannot be understood without reference to St Paul, who will often address a person, for example Timothy, by referring to ‘your spirit’ rather than simply to ‘you.’ What is the significance of this? Well, he is addressing someone close to God who has God’s spirit. So when we reply, ‘and with your spirit,’ we are indicating that we are part of a spiritual community, it is God’s spirit that has gathered us together.

The prayer Catholics say prior to communion, which currently reads, “Lord, I am not worthy to receive you,” would now be translated, “Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof.” This response, Roche said, is supposed to be reminiscent of the Centurion who asked Jesus to heal his servant. (found in Matthew 8:8 and Luke 7:6)....

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