It's official. The Catholic Knight is retired.  I'm hanging up the helmet and passing the torch. There will be no more articles, no more commentaries, no more calls to action. THIS BLOG IS CLOSED. I've spent a very long time thinking about this, I believe the time has come, and is a bit overdue.  I want to thank my readers for everything, but most especially for your encouragement and your willingness to go out there and fight the good fight. So, that being the case, I've spend the last several weeks looking for bloggers who are fairly active, and best represent something akin to the way I think and what I believe.  I recommend the following blogs for my readers to bookmark and check on regularly. Pick one as your favourite, or pick them all. They are all great..... In His Majesty's Service, THE CATHOLIC KNIGHT

Friday, April 13, 2007

'Lost Tomb of Jesus' is Losing Scholarly Support

Abuja, Apr 13, 2007 / 11:03 am (CNA).- Several prominent scholars, who were featured in interviews in the controversial documentary Lost Tomb of Jesus, have now revised their statements, reported The Jerusalem Post.

The film argues that 10 ancient ossuaries discovered in southeastern residential Jerusalem neighborhood of Talpiot in 1980 contained the bones of Jesus and his family. The filmmakers attempted to explain some of the inscriptions on the ossuaries by suggesting that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene, and that the couple had a son, named Judah.

The most astounding revision is that of University of Toronto statistician Andrey Feuerverger, who provided statements that supported the central point of the film.

Feuerverger stated in the film that the odds are 600 to one in favor of the tomb being the family burial cave of Jesus of Nazareth. He now says these figures referred to the probability of a cluster of such names appearing together.

According to The Jerusalem Post, this conclusion has now been changed on the Discovery Channel website to read: "It is unlikely that an equally surprising cluster of names would have arisen by chance under purely random sampling."

The scholars’ revised statements are recorded in the 16-page paper titled "Cracks in the Foundation: How the Lost Tomb of Jesus story is losing its scholarly support"...

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